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COVID-19 Weekly Bulletin April 2, 2020

COVID-19 Weekly Bulletin – During this COVID-19 pandemic, being asked to say home and not being able to see friends and family in person, can be quite a challenge.  This week’s bulletin addresses this challenge and offers some ideas on how to stay connected even while in isolation.  You can find the bulletin on our Newsletter page or click on the link below to open it directly.

COVID-19 Weekly Bulletin March 27, 2020

COVID-19 Weekly Bulletin - In an effort to maintain continuous contact with our members as well as provide useful information during this unprecedented time, Upper Island Counselling has started a weekly bulletin.  This bulletin will contain tips and information related to what is currently happening in the world and our community during this COVID-19 pandemic.  Below is the first of these bulletins that was sent out to our member companies last week. 

 

COVID-19 Response Update

 

I am reaching out with an update to last week’s communication and to assure you that Upper Island Counselling continues to support our member companies and clients during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The main points are:

CMHC Resource for Anxiety during COVID-19

If you find yourself feeling anxious about the Coronavirus, remember that anxiety is a normal reaction to uncertainty and potentially harmful situations. The Canadian Mental Health Association has put together an informative article that validates the anxiety many of us are experiencing while offering suggestions about managing anxiety and stress in these unprecedented times.
 

Hearing Voices Workshop

Do you have a loved one with psychosis or work with people who struggle with this form of mental illness? If you do, or simply feel motivated to learn more about what it is like for people who experience psychosis, the Mental Health Recovery Partners Society North Island is presenting the Hearing Voices Workshop in Campbell River on Wed, Feb 12th from 1:30-4:30pm. For more information, please see the poster below.

Empathy vs. Sympathy

 

We loved this short animated video with voiceover by Dr. Brene Brown so much that we want to share it with everyone.  In it she explains the difference between empathy and sympathy and how empathy is really about making a connection with another person. 

High Work Engagement and Work Stress

High work engagement refers to viewing one’s job as very important, taking one’s job seriously, and applying a great degree of effort toward the successful execution of one’s job. Being highly engaged with work is often touted as an ideal way for workers to be on the job and as the best approach for achieving career success and satisfaction. Indeed, being highly engaged with work can lead to career success and satisfaction. However, if other work-related factors are not present, then high work engagement can also be related to serious mental health challenges.

Welcoming Our Newest Team Member

We are excited to announce that starting in May we had a Counselling Intern join our team!

Cheryl Close is in the final stages of completing her Master of Arts Degree in Counselling Psychology from Yorkville University. She will be joining us 3 days per week and seeing clients from May till December 2019 in order to complete her clinical practicum requirements. Cheryl enjoys the outdoors and has a passion for nature. 

Welcome to the team Cheryl!

 

Mindful Eating and Disordered Eating Prevention

“The core principles of mindful eating include being aware of the nourishment available through the process of food preparation and consumption, choosing enjoyable and nutritious foods, acknowledging food preferences nonjudgmentally, recognizing and honoring physical hunger and satiety cues, and using wisdom to guide eating decisions.” –Cheryl Harris, MPH, RD

Eating for Mental Health and Well Being

The idea that our eating habits have a significant impact on our physical health has been a well-established fact for many years. More recently, research has provided evidence to show that our eating habits are also closely related to our mental health and well-being.

So, what are healthy eating habits? Let’s start with the types of food that have been found to support mental health. A number of studies have shown a range of outcomes connecting nutrition and mental health, including: